Always striving for excellence

Fourth grader achieves in and out of the classroom

T-R PHOTO BY SARA JORDAN-HEINTZ
Alexa Oliveros, 10, a fourth grader at Anson Elementary School, excels academically. In her XLP class she helped construct a device (pictured) using littleBits building blocks, that would help a non-verbal student in their school communicate his/her needs with the teacher. When Alexa grows up, she would like to be a veterinarian.

T-R PHOTO BY SARA JORDAN-HEINTZ Alexa Oliveros, 10, a fourth grader at Anson Elementary School, excels academically. In her XLP class she helped construct a device (pictured) using littleBits building blocks, that would help a non-verbal student in their school communicate his/her needs with the teacher. When Alexa grows up, she would like to be a veterinarian.

Alexa Oliveros, 10, a fourth grader at Anson Elementary School, has a mind that is always thinking, computing, processing and learning.

“Alexa is always striving to learn new things,” said Extended Learning Program (XLP) instructor Nicole Holman. “She has set very high goals for herself in terms of her education and is determined to reach them. She takes everything in and is constantly making connections between new learning and past learning. She excels in both her work in her fourth grade classroom, as well as her work in XLP.”

Alexa said her favorite activities during the day are reading, working on math problems and playing tetherball. She plays the recorder in music class. She favors historical fiction books, particularly the time period of the 1800s.

“Alexa enjoys helping other students in multiple grades,” said homeroom teacher Katie Towns. “She reads books to kindergartners during her recess time. Not only is she an outstanding student, she is a very kind and generous person to her classmates and teachers.”

Now in her second year participating in the school’s XLP, Alexa likes to push herself to work through complex concepts and explore new schools of thought. The pupil does Math League, consisting of higher level multi-step problems, and WordMasters, which uses higher level vocabulary to solve analogy-based problems.

She and two fellow classmates recently completed an XLP assignment, whereby they were tasked with creating a device using littleBits building blocks that would help a non-verbal student in their school communicate his/her needs with the teacher. The students created a buzzer system that waves a red flag with a frowning face.

“Autistic kids see things in pictures,” Alexa explained.

In her spare time, the student continues to nurture her imagination.

“I like to invent stuff at home. I’ve made a lot of vending machines,” Alexa said.

When she grows up, the student would like to be a veterinarian.

“She just amazes me every day I work with her. She has such a great mind, and a personality to go with it. I’m lucky to get to help her explore. I can’t wait to see what she does with her life,” Holman concluded.

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Contact Sara Jordan-Heintz at 641-753-6611 or sjordan@timesrepublican.com