Doctors: Sen. John McCain has brain tumor

AP PHOTO
In this July 11, file photo, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington. McCain has been diagnosed with a brain tumor after a blood clot was removed.

AP PHOTO In this July 11, file photo, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington. McCain has been diagnosed with a brain tumor after a blood clot was removed.

WASHINGTON — Arizona Sen. John McCain, the 2008 Republican presidential nominee with a well-known maverick streak that often vexes his GOP colleagues, has been diagnosed with a brain tumor, his office said in a statement Wednesday.

The 80-year-old lawmaker has glioblastoma, an aggressive cancer, according to doctors at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix, where McCain had a blood clot removed from above his left eye last Friday. The senator and his family are reviewing further treatment, including a combination of chemotherapy and radiation.

“Subsequent tissue pathology revealed that a primary brain tumor known as a glioblastoma was associated with the blood clot,” his office said in a statement.

About 20,000 people in the U.S. each year are diagnosed with a glioblastoma, a particularly aggressive type of brain tumor. The American Cancer Society puts the five-year survival rate for patients over 55 at about 4 percent.

The tumor digs tentacle-like roots into normal brain tissue. Patients fare best when surgeons can cut out all the visible tumor, which happened with McCain’s tumor, according to his office.