Sign In | Create an Account | Welcome, . My Account | Logout | Subscribe | Submit News | Contact Us | Home RSS
 
 
 

Fall fishing fun makes lifetime memories

September 18, 2010
By GARRY BRANDENBURG

WALLEYE DERBY participants this year at Halley's Lodge in Ontario had a great trip to this fly-in trophy only fishing lake. The date was Aug. 13 - 15. As usual, local fishing enthusiast Dennis Baker of St. Anthony arranged for the event and signed up the eager folks from the lower 48. This year's group included Zearing resident Melvin Stalzer, Dennis Baker, and the following folks: Scott Harrington of Ironwood, MI, Joseph Cassis of Johnston, Mitch Hauschildt of Springfield, Mo., Judy Hauschildt of Marshalltown, and Marvin Ozinga of Oskaloosa.

A typical day at the camp goes like this ... after the float plane ride into the remote Canadian wilderness setting. Once the folks arrive, the facilities are anything but primitive. Deluxe and quite functional would define the cabins, lodge and facilities. Each morning at 0600, coffee is served. Breakfast is at 0700. Boats launch at 0800. Noontime finds everyone at a shore lunch eating walleye. By 1700, all boats are back at camp and at 1800, supper is served. Scores are posted for the day.

Halley's Camp is about 700 miles from central Iowa and about 200 miles into Ontario. This is a trophy only lake. Walleye greater than 27 inches long will get the angler a certificate and hat. Smallmouth Bass of 18 inches or longer yield the same prizes. So too for Northerns if over 38 inches long.

Article Photos

WALLEYE DERBY participants this year at Halley’s Lodge in Ontario had a great trip to this fly-in trophy only fishing lake. The date was Aug. 13 - 15. As usual, local fishing enthusiast Dennis Baker of St. Anthony arranged for the event and signed up the eager folks from the lower 48. This year’s group included Zearing resident Melvin Stalzer, Dennis Baker, and the following folks: Scott Harrington of Ironwood, MI, Joseph Cassis of Johnston, Mitch Hauschildt of Springfield, Mo., Judy Hauschildt of Marshalltown, and Marvin Ozinga of Oskaloosa. 
A typical day at the camp goes like this ... after the float plane ride into the remote Canadian wilderness setting. Once the folks arrive, the facilities are anything but primitive. Deluxe and quite functional would define the cabins, lodge and facilities. Each morning at 0600, coffee is served. Breakfast is at 0700. Boats launch at 0800. Noontime finds everyone at a shore lunch eating walleye. By 1700, all boats are back at camp and at 1800, supper is served. Scores are posted for the day. 
Halley’s Camp is about 700 miles from central Iowa and about 200 miles into Ontario. This is a trophy only lake. Walleye greater than 27 inches long will get the angler a certificate and hat. Smallmouth Bass of 18 inches or longer yield the same prizes. So too for Northerns if over 38 inches long. 
All of the people fishing break into teams and the teams compete in a strictly friendly endeavor to catch the longest fishes of any species.  Individual efforts are directed at catching walleye over 20 inches long, and measuring the longest five fish for the day. That is how first, second and third place awards are determined. 
At the end of the second day, scores are posted and added to the previous days score. The tally is run and winners determined.  Nice plaques are presented as souvenirs of their time in Canada. 
For those who have been to Canada to fish on one of her thousands of pristine lakes, it is a thrill and an experience worth the effort. It is a great escape from the rat-race of work back home. Just fish, enjoy great company and great food for three days. All too soon the party is over and going home becomes reality. But the memories live on ... and on ... and on. Fall fishing can do that.
———
BIRD EGGS were a big business/hobby for a very few dedicated folks over 100 years ago.This is what I learned after attending a slide show presentation last Saturday by Zearing native Carol Henderson.  Henderson has been the top go-to-guy in Minnesota for more than 30 years for the DNR’s non-game wildlife programs. His talk told of the history of egg collecting and specifically the collection of over 4,000 eggs by Ralph Handsaker, a Colo and Zearing area farmer that lived from 1886 until 1969. What he saw on the rapidly changing landscape was critical to our understanding today of what was lost.  
Bird egg collecting was perfectly legal then. Today it is not legal at all in any fashion whatsoever. Those were different times. The hobby was quite common in Europe and England prior to the mass migrations of folks to America. The hobby followed people as they settled into the United States. In those days, conservation efforts, knowledge and enforcement were on a steep learning curve. Just about anything was okay to do.
The nest of a bird was located just as the last egg of a clutch was laid, then all the eggs were taken, cleaned of all internal contents, and carefully cataloged as to species, date, location and the collector’s name. Every habitat type that held birds was exploited from deep forests, prairie lands and wetlands. To be able to know what one had, a lot of self education was necessary to learn from the annual migration arrival dates as birds moved north. Those who collected eggs became extremely sophisticated about the natural history of the subjects they sought. 
Eggs were bought and sold and traded world wide. Without knowing it at the time, the detailed documentation of sites where eggs came from would help tell a fantastic natural history story more than 100 years later. It was the detailed field notes and cataloged egg boxes that would reap benefits for scientists long into the future. 
Some collections by avid egg gatherers numbered over 10,000. One Colo area farmer, Ralph Handsaker (1886 - 1969), was also a naturalist and avid egg collector, one of the best of the best in his day. He had over 4,000 eggs, as noted above, representing over 300 species. While he gathered many local and Iowa bird eggs, he and others world wide traded and sold eggs from every continent. That is how an ostrich, or a great auk egg, for example, gets into the heartland collection of a farmer.    
Handsaker’s home was boarded up after he died. Everything in the house, all of its natural history mounted animals and two huge cabinets full of drawer after drawer of neatly spaced and precisely documented egg compartments were to remain untouched from 1969 until 2003. As Henderson said, “it was if time stood still in that old farmhouse.” 
I do not have the time or space in this column to tell the entire story of “ Oology: Ralph’s Talking Eggs”, the title of the book that Henderson wrote to document how the collection came to be, how it was rediscovered, and how today at its safe repository at Yale University’s Peabody Museum of Natural History, the scientific community is still learning from Mr. Handsaker’s efforts. I urge anyone so inclined to buy the book, read it and marvel at what once was and what is not to be ever again.
———
Now, back in 2010, today is the opener of the YOUTH DEER SEASON. Yes, folks, fall is approaching fast. The youth deer season runs from September 18th through Oct. 3. It is open only to young men and women less than 16 years of age on the day they obtain their license. While hunting, they must be under the direct supervision of an adult mentor who has a valid hunting license and a paid habitat fee. Page 27 of the Iowa DNR rules and regulations booklet has the details pertaining to youth deer hunts. Check it out carefully. 
At the time of printing of the DNR regulations booklet, not all the data was in concerning those locker plants in Iowa that will participate in the HUSH program this year. Well, the State Center locker has been and is again this year accepting deer donated by hunters. The meat is prepared as venison burger and used by the needy through the ‘Help Us Stop Hunger’ campaign. Page 33 of the rules booklet is not complete. Do add the State Center Locker to the list and give Ralph a call at his place of business if you have a deer to donate. Thanks.
———
Be sure to mark Prairie Heritage Day at the GrimesFarm and Conservation Center as one of the activities to take part in Sept. 25 from 2 – 5 p.m., during the Oktemberfest celebration. This annual event features many different activities that were a part of every day life for the early settlers. Take part in rope making, candle dipping, apple cider making, sample fry bread for one cent per piece, participate in the bison chip throw, cross cut sawing, observe weaving, and early steam engines. Join the fun and learn about the way our ancestors did things.
———
Garry Brandenburg is a graduate of Iowa State University with BS degree in Fish & Wildlife Biology. He is the retired director of the Marshall County Conservation Board. Contact him at PO Box 96, Albion, IA 50005.

All of the people fishing break into teams and the teams compete in a strictly friendly endeavor to catch the longest fishes of any species. Individual efforts are directed at catching walleye over 20 inches long, and measuring the longest five fish for the day. That is how first, second and third place awards are determined.

At the end of the second day, scores are posted and added to the previous days score. The tally is run and winners determined. Nice plaques are presented as souvenirs of their time in Canada.

For those who have been to Canada to fish on one of her thousands of pristine lakes, it is a thrill and an experience worth the effort. It is a great escape from the rat-race of work back home. Just fish, enjoy great company and great food for three days. All too soon the party is over and going home becomes reality. But the memories live on ... and on ... and on. Fall fishing can do that.

---

BIRD EGGS were a big business/hobby for a very few dedicated folks over 100 years ago.This is what I learned after attending a slide show presentation last Saturday by Zearing native Carol Henderson. Henderson has been the top go-to-guy in Minnesota for more than 30 years for the DNR's non-game wildlife programs. His talk told of the history of egg collecting and specifically the collection of over 4,000 eggs by Ralph Handsaker, a Colo and Zearing area farmer that lived from 1886 until 1969. What he saw on the rapidly changing landscape was critical to our understanding today of what was lost.

Bird egg collecting was perfectly legal then. Today it is not legal at all in any fashion whatsoever. Those were different times. The hobby was quite common in Europe and England prior to the mass migrations of folks to America. The hobby followed people as they settled into the United States. In those days, conservation efforts, knowledge and enforcement were on a steep learning curve. Just about anything was okay to do.

The nest of a bird was located just as the last egg of a clutch was laid, then all the eggs were taken, cleaned of all internal contents, and carefully cataloged as to species, date, location and the collector's name. Every habitat type that held birds was exploited from deep forests, prairie lands and wetlands. To be able to know what one had, a lot of self education was necessary to learn from the annual migration arrival dates as birds moved north. Those who collected eggs became extremely sophisticated about the natural history of the subjects they sought.

Eggs were bought and sold and traded world wide. Without knowing it at the time, the detailed documentation of sites where eggs came from would help tell a fantastic natural history story more than 100 years later. It was the detailed field notes and cataloged egg boxes that would reap benefits for scientists long into the future.

Some collections by avid egg gatherers numbered over 10,000. One Colo area farmer, Ralph Handsaker (1886 - 1969), was also a naturalist and avid egg collector, one of the best of the best in his day. He had over 4,000 eggs, as noted above, representing over 300 species. While he gathered many local and Iowa bird eggs, he and others world wide traded and sold eggs from every continent. That is how an ostrich, or a great auk egg, for example, gets into the heartland collection of a farmer.

Handsaker's home was boarded up after he died. Everything in the house, all of its natural history mounted animals and two huge cabinets full of drawer after drawer of neatly spaced and precisely documented egg compartments were to remain untouched from 1969 until 2003. As Henderson said, "it was if time stood still in that old farmhouse."

I do not have the time or space in this column to tell the entire story of " Oology: Ralph's Talking Eggs", the title of the book that Henderson wrote to document how the collection came to be, how it was rediscovered, and how today at its safe repository at Yale University's Peabody Museum of Natural History, the scientific community is still learning from Mr. Handsaker's efforts. I urge anyone so inclined to buy the book, read it and marvel at what once was and what is not to be ever again.

---

Now, back in 2010, today is the opener of the YOUTH DEER SEASON. Yes, folks, fall is approaching fast. The youth deer season runs from September 18th through Oct. 3. It is open only to young men and women less than 16 years of age on the day they obtain their license. While hunting, they must be under the direct supervision of an adult mentor who has a valid hunting license and a paid habitat fee. Page 27 of the Iowa DNR rules and regulations booklet has the details pertaining to youth deer hunts. Check it out carefully.

At the time of printing of the DNR regulations booklet, not all the data was in concerning those locker plants in Iowa that will participate in the HUSH program this year. Well, the State Center locker has been and is again this year accepting deer donated by hunters. The meat is prepared as venison burger and used by the needy through the 'Help Us Stop Hunger' campaign. Page 33 of the rules booklet is not complete. Do add the State Center Locker to the list and give Ralph a call at his place of business if you have a deer to donate. Thanks.

---

Be sure to mark Prairie Heritage Day at the GrimesFarm and Conservation Center as one of the activities to take part in Sept. 25 from 2 5 p.m., during the Oktemberfest celebration. This annual event features many different activities that were a part of every day life for the early settlers. Take part in rope making, candle dipping, apple cider making, sample fry bread for one cent per piece, participate in the bison chip throw, cross cut sawing, observe weaving, and early steam engines. Join the fun and learn about the way our ancestors did things.

---

Garry Brandenburg is a graduate of Iowa State University with BS degree in Fish & Wildlife Biology. He is the retired director of the Marshall County Conservation Board. Contact him at PO Box 96, Albion, IA 50005.

 
 

 

I am looking for: