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Sandy uprooted trees by the thousands

November 18, 2012
By JIM FITZGERALD , THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK - They fell by the thousands, like soldiers in some vast battle of giants, dropping to the earth in submission to a greater force.

The winds of Superstorm Sandy took out more trees in the neighborhoods, parks and forests of New York and New Jersey than any previous storm on record, experts say.

Nearly 10,000 were lost in New York City alone, and "thousands upon thousands" went down on Long Island, a state parks spokesman said. New Jersey utilities reported more than 113,000 destroyed or damaged trees.

Article Photos

AP PHOTO
In this Oct. 29, file photo, David Zwingle and his fiancee Alejandra Juarez take a look out of their front door in Morristown, N.J., moments after a maple tree was blown down by high winds from Superstorm Sandy. Experts say Sandy's winds took out more trees in the neighborhoods, parks and forests of New York and New Jersey than any previous storm on record.

"These are perfectly healthy trees, some more than 120 years old, that have survived hurricanes, ice storms, nor'easters, anything Mother Nature could throw their way," said Todd Forrest, a vice president at the New York Botanical Garden. "Sandy was just too much."

As oaks, spruces and sycamores buckled, many became Sandy's agents, contributing to the destruction by crashing through houses or tearing through electric wires. They caused several deaths, including those of two boys playing in a suburban family room. They left hundreds of thousands of people without power for more than a week.

And as homeowners and public officials deal with the cleanup, some tree care experts say the shocking force of the storm weeks ago might mean they should reassess where and how to replant.

"When trees go down that have lived a long life and been so beneficial, it's terrible when they cause injury to people and property," said Nina Bassuk, program leader at the Urban Horticulture Institute at Cornell University. "We have to replant better and do it smarter."

For example, she said, shorter trees like hawthorns and crabapples should be planted below electric wires.

She also said a soil substitute can help trees extend their roots beneath pavement so maybe they can keep their balance in high winds.

Frank Juliano, executive director of the Reeves-Reed Arboretum in Summit, N.J., which lost uncounted trees on its perimeter, said those might not be replaced.

"Would they just come down again?" he asked. "This is a global issue. We all have to deal with the ramifications of what's happening with our world and environment."

 
 

 

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