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Council approves rezoning ordinance

T-R photo by Thomas Nelson — Joe Carter, Chamber vice-chairman, presents the housing study to the council. The Marshalltown Chamber of Commerce and city have worked together on several housing studies during the last decade.

A new housing development is closer to fruition.

The Marshalltown City Council approved the first reading of an ordinance to rezone property on East Southridge Road for a housing complex proposed by developer Mike Hayworth, president of Rosemont Companies LLC.

“The final plat will be coming to the council in October,” said Michelle Spohnheimer, Marshalltown housing and community development director.

The complex will consist of approximately 16 single family lots.

Hayworth estimates the total cost of the development will be around $4 million after the construction is finished.

T-R photo by Thomas Nelson — Michelle Spohnheimer, Marshalltown housing and community development director, speaks to the council about a rezoning project for a new housing complex. The Marshalltown City Council approved the first reading of ordinance to rezone property on East Southridge Road for the new development.

The rezoning will change the lots’ designation for residential use.

Hayworth has not had difficulties putting the project together while working with the city.

The council also heard an update on a housing study from the Marshalltown Chamber of Commerce.

The Marshalltown Chamber of Commerce and city have worked together on several housing studies during the last decade, which time and time again showed the need for more housing in Marshalltown.

The new study suggests the council should establish more tax incremental financing, or TIF, districts and be more welcoming to developers.

Joe Carter, Chamber vice-chairman, presented the study to the council.

The city helped hire McClure Consulting conduct the study which has not yet been made public or been presented to the council.

The chamber approached McClure in Feb. 2020.

“The chamber board has approved dedicating $250,000, that is $2,500 per home, for 100 homes for a portion of the home-buying incentive McClure has proposed,” Carter said. “The Chamber wanted to be a leader in supporting the effort.”

The study details a housing shortage in the United States for micropolitian communities, similar in size to Marshalltown, and smaller communities.

“We need developers and we need builders,’ Carter said.

He said the city could be better when dealing with developers, according to his own experience.

“I think we’re good,” he said. “I think we can be great.”

In other business:

• The council accepted a $2.9 million grant from the U.S. Department of Commerce Economic Development Administration for the Edgewood Street extension and flood mitigation project with council member Gary Thompson voting against the measure.

• A resolution beginning construction on the South 12th Avenue sidewalk project was authorized with council member Al Hoop voting in opposition.

• The city approved an agreement with Bolton and Menk to work on the creation of quiet zone.

• Council members discussed a requisition for a proposal to work on rewriting the city’s zoning ordinance for the first time since the 1950s.

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Contact Thomas Nelson at 641-753-6611 or tnelson@timesrepublican.com.

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